iOS 101 or … Basic animation, Auto Layout, and view geometry – Part 5

[Download the full Xcode project from GitHub.]

Today, I’m going answer all the questions I posed in this series of posts entitled “Basic animation, Auto Layout, and view geometry – Part X” (see parts 1, 2, 3, and 4). I’ll help you understand how how I created the following iPhone animation using Swift 3.0 — and/or how to get started with your first iOS app:

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Basic animation, Auto Layout, and view geometry – Part 4

[Download the full Xcode project from GitHub.]

Today, I’m going to push you to understand how how I created the following iPhone animation using Swift 3.0:

I’ll give you everything you need to figure out what I did — but I won’t explain it for you. Explanation will come later (in the next post, I tie all posts in this series, 1, 2, 3, and 4 together). I want you to learn about my design and code, not just copy and paste it. There is a method to my seeming madness. Hang in there with me through this series of posts.

After providing you with diagrams, source code, references, definitions, inline commentary, etc., I want you to be able to answer some questions about building iOS animations, even if it requires you to do some research, before I put all the pieces together in the final chapter (post) in this series. Remember that I started this blog with the intention of helping new/aspiring iOS app developers get started in an exciting, creative, and potentially financially rewarding profession. I don’t want to just provide code for you to copy and paste into your own app projects, I want you to become the best of the best iOS designers and developers. So let me:

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2016: A good year to be an iOS app developer (and how to become a better one)

It can be good to be an iOS app developer, but not easy to be a great one (we’ll talk about that later in this article). There are many opportunities for app programmers looking to work as employees for companies. There are plenty of opportunities for developers who prefer freelancing. It’s frustrating, trying to come up with novel apps that generate any significant revenue, when it seems that every idea under the sun has already been turned into an app by “someone else.” Apple continues to push out buggy versions of iOS, the iOS SDK, and Xcode — especially in early versions of new products. Yet most of us would agree that Apple’s hardware and software, even their development tools, continue to be elegant and cutting edge. It’s hard to argue with the bottom line as “Apple App Store developers raked in $20 billion in 2016, up 40% year over year,” according to an article from CNBC:

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